Friday, May 08, 2009

Preventing and/or Reversing Venous Thromboemboism or VTE

I read with interest the appended article on the relationship between certain types of urine albumin and Venous Thromboembolism. I was particularly interested in this quote:

"The risk for VTE rises with age, with the incidence coming in at less than 0.005 percent in people under the age of 15 and increasing to as high as 0.5 percent in 80-year-olds. Slower blood flow and changes in blood composition are major risk factors, but in many cases no risks can be found."

But... the suggested treatment, "..microalbuminuria can be treated by nonanticoagulant medication.." apparently relates to anti-inflamatory agents, such as low dose aspirin, etc.. which is still highly acidic.

The increase in proteins in the blood and urine that can lead to VTE may be caused by several of the following factors:

1) Congestion of the bowel due to undigested animal proteins. This can cause congestion and/or damage to the intestinal villi leading to deficient and inferior stem cell and red blood production and an increase in thrombocyctes.

2) A diet high in acidic animal protein and dairy products can create an increase in blood and then tissue acidosis leading to increased amounts of blood and urine protein from cellular breakdown as seen in dried blood testing and urine analysis.

3) An increase in dietary acid can cause blood cells to stick together causing oxygen deprivation leading to blood and tissue breakdown and increased proteins in the blood and urine.

4) An increase in sticky platelets or thrombosis as the result of excessive red blood cell breakdown and the birth of red blood cell fragments, known as platelets. This biological transformation of red blood cells to platelets is caused by excess dietary and metabolic acid that has not been properly eliminated through the four channels of elimination - bowels, skin, bladder and lungs.

An increase in thrombocyctes or platelets is the result of red blood cell deterioration due to dietary and metabolic acid.

It was through years of viewing the live blood where I captured and recorded platelets being born out of the red blood cell as the red blood cell was breaking down or transforming. The biological transformation of the red blood cell to a thrombocycte is triggered by a decrease in the pH from dietary and/or metabolic acid.

To protect the blood and to keep it from sticking together or from transforming into sticky platelets you must support the alkaline design of the fluids of the body and keep the bowels clear of undigested animal protein and sticky acidic dairy products.

Because of my observations from live and dried blood cell testing and other functional blood testing I developed pHour Salts has a strong alkaline anti-inflammatory or anti-acid to buffer dietary and metabolic acid and to act as a "lubricant" to help keep blood cells from sticking together or transforming into sticky platelets which may lead to VTE.

The pHour Salts, pHlavor salts, puripHy salts and pHlush salts, with an alkaline diet and lifestyle will help to maintain the alkaline design of the blood fluids and keep the "blood composition" and the bowels clean, healthy and strong. This has shown to be the case when viewing the live and dried blood tests and reviewing functional medical tests, including a Complete Blood Count and a Blood Chemistry of each client/patient on the pH Miracle Lifestyle, Diet and nutritional program after a 12 week program.

The result in all clinical cases has been a normalization in platelet counts, a reduction in microalbuminuria and the elimination of thrombosis or Venous Thromboembolism - VTE.

VTE seems to be increasing in the populations as people become older and, especially, more sedentary and can be resolved with an alkaline lifestyle, diet and alkaline supplements, including the pHour Salts, pHlavor salts, puripHy salts and pHlush salts.

Link Between Urine Protein and Blood Clots

(Ivanhoe Newswire) - People who have higher levels of a certain protein in their urine may be more likely to experience dangerous blood clots in their legs or lungs.

That's the take home message from Dutch researchers who followed more than 8,500 people over about an 8-year period. Those with higher levels of albumin in their urine were significantly more likely to develop venous thromboembolism, or VTE. Overall, 3 percent of people with higher levels albumin - known as microalbuminuria -- had a VTE during the study, versus just 1 percent of those with normal levels of the protein. Microalbuminuria is known to affect proteins involved in clotting of the blood.

"The fact that microalbuminuria has a high prevalence in the general population (7.2 percent) suggests that on the population level, microalbuminuria may be an important risk factor for VTE," write the authors.

The good news is microalbuminuria can be treated by nonanticoagulant medications, which means the treatment would not raise the risk for bleeding.

"Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of these drugs on the risk of VTE," conclude the researchers.

The risk for VTE rises with age, with the incidence coming in at less than 0.005 percent in people under the age of 15 and increasing to as high as 0.5 percent in 80-year-olds. Slower blood flow and changes in blood composition are major risk factors, but in many cases no risks can be found. This study may help explain at least some of those cases.

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